University of Michigan
News for faculty, staff and retirees

August 19, 2019

In The News

August 14, 2019

Comments by Marlon James Sales, a research fellow in comparative literature, were featured throughout a story about the overlooked Spanish influence on the Philippines, a country ruled by Spain for more than 300 years through the late 19th century.

Australian Broadcasting Corporation

August 14, 2019

“We cannot criminalize free speech, but we can make it socially and politically unacceptable to fan the flames of division for political gain. As a society, we have used social pressure to discourage drunk driving, bullying, and uttering racial slurs. Is it too much to ask the leader of the free world to stop exploiting differences of race and national origin, to protect our national security and public safety?” wrote Barbara McQuade, professor from practice at the Law School.

The Atlantic

August 14, 2019

Donald Grimes, an economist with the U-M Economic Growth Institute, argues that the minimum wage should vary by state, hitting a sweet spot of about 60 percent of the state’s median wage. That standard, he says, “will ensure that our lowest-wage workers will have the same standard of living no matter where they live and will minimize any potential loss of jobs due to a higher rate.”

U.S. News & World Report

August 14, 2019

According to research by Peter Alsip, ecological modeling data analyst at the Cooperative Institute for Great Lakes Research, and colleagues, Asian carp are likely to find enough food to spread farther if they establish breeding populations in Lake Michigan, reinforcing the importance of preventing the invasive fish from gaining a foothold.

The Associated Press / The Washington Post

August 14, 2019

“When you’re dealing with senior citizens with some degree of memory or other cognitive impairment, PARO is ideal — it’s an embraceable, novel animaloid that they can interact with,” said Jennifer Robertson, professor of anthropology and history of art, commenting on a Japanese robotic pet designed for therapeutic uses with the elderly.

IEEE Pulse

August 7, 2019

“The Cielo Vista massacre (in El Paso) demonstrates that white nationalism has become a killing machine that shows no sign of abating. Just as we need to tackle gun control seriously and systematically, we also need to tackle and dismantle white nationalist ideas, for the sake of democracy and human decency,” wrote Alexandra Minna Stern, professor of American culture, history, women’s studies, and obstetrics and gynecology.

Newsweek

August 7, 2019

Kevin Boehnke, research investigator at the Chronic Pain and Fatigue Research Center, cautions that while promising, research on cannabidiol, or CBD, has current limitations. “It’s frustrating, because we’re in this space where people are using (cannabis products) all the time, but the science is pretty far behind the policy.”

CNET

August 7, 2019

“In treating all Chinese students and scholars as suspect, the United States jeopardizes the benefits of one of our largest service ‘exports’ to China and risks diminishing one of our greatest sources of soft power — our world class universities,” said Mary Gallagher, professor of political science and director of the Lieberthal-Rogel Center for Chinese Studies, on the prospect the U.S. may restrict Chinese students coming to America.

ChinaFile

August 7, 2019

“Cystic fibrosis gets a lot more attention, focus and support because it affects a demographic group with potential resources and other characteristics. Sickle cell disease often affects the most vulnerable of populations. Around 90 percent are Medicaid-enrolled. Sadly, there is also likely a measure of unconscious and conscious bias toward this population,” said Gary Freed, professor of pediatrics and health management and policy.

The New York Times

August 7, 2019

“The bottom line is that we will never reach the dead zone reduction target of 1,900 square miles until more serious actions are taken to reduce the loss of Midwest fertilizers into the Mississippi River system,” said Don Scavia, professor emeritus of environment and sustainability, commenting on the Gulf of Mexico’s 7,000-square-mile region of water without enough oxygen for fish and other marine life to survive.

U.S. News & World Report

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